Wyoming Lease Agreement Templates (6)

A Wyoming lease agreement is a binding contract covering the terms between a landlord and a tenant of a rental property. The agreement typically includes details such as the names of the parties involved, the property’s physical address, the lease length, and the total rental dollar amount. Other factors such as pets, maintenance obligations, and restrictions on the use of the property.

Last updated March 29th, 2024

A Wyoming lease agreement is a binding contract covering the terms between a landlord and a tenant of a rental property. The agreement typically includes details such as the names of the parties involved, the property’s physical address, the lease length, and the total rental dollar amount. Other factors such as pets, maintenance obligations, and restrictions on the use of the property.

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By Type (6)

Standard Lease Agreement – An arrangement between a landlord and a tenant discussing the length of a property lease.
Commercial Lease Agreement – A binding contract between a business and a landlord regarding the rental space for an establishment.
Month-to-Month Lease Agreement – This is a short-term agreement that repeats the original lease at the end of every month,
Rent-to-Own Agreement – This is where the renter has the ability to purchase the property from the property owner.
Roommate Agreement – This is used to set terms and conditions for a shared rental space legally.
Sublease Agreement – In the state of Wyoming, a contract in which the sublessor rents the property to a sublessee.

Disclosures (2)

Lead-Based Paint Disclosure – In homes built before 1978, a lead-based paint disclosure is required to be completed and signed by both the landlord and renter by the federal government. Homes built in 1978 and later do not apply. If the property is known to have lead paint then the landlord must provide an EPA pamphlet.

Non-Refundable Deposits – Non-refundable deposits must be written in the lease agreement at the time of deposit so the tenant will know they may not be getting a refund. (§ 1-21-1207)

Security Deposit

Maximum Amount – Wyoming law does not specify the maximum amount a landlord can charge for a security deposit. The amount must be clearly stated in the lease agreement before each party signs.

Returning to Tenant –  The landlord must return the security deposit to the tenant within 30 days of the lease’s end without interest. The security deposit must be returned to the renter 15 days after acquiring the renter’s updated mailing address. 30 days or 15 days with the updated address, whichever date is later. If damage is done to the property the landlord will receive an extension of 30 days to return the funds.  § 1-21-1208

Landlord Access

General Access – There are no specific rules or regulations of when a landlord may enter a leased property in the state of Wyoming. The general rule is a 2 or 3-day written notice before entering a property. It is advised to have the landlord entry included in the original lease agreement; however, it is not mandatory. § 1-21-1205(a)(iii)

Emergency Access – The landlord may enter the rental property in case of emergency. The state of Wyoming underlines no rules on notifying the tenet upon entry.

Paying Rent

Grace Period –  The state of Wyoming enforces no specific grace period. The landlord has the right to issue a 3-day notice to quit if not paid on time; however, this must be agreed upon in the original lease agreement.   § 1-21-1204(vi)

Maximum Late Fee – The late fee must be included in the original Wyoming lease agreement to be enforced. There is no maximum for the amount the landlord can charge the tenet for a late fee.

Returned Checks (NSF) – The landlord has the right to charge a maximum of $30 for a bounced check that a tenant writes. § 1-1-115(a)

Reasons for Eviction (3)

Non-Payment of Rent – The tenant may be evicted from the property in a shorter period than the lease agreement states if the renter fails to pay the rent on time. Wyo. Stat. §§ 1-21-1202 and 1-21-1203

Non-Compliance – The tenant may be evicted from the property if there is a tenant holdover, damage to the property, disruption of others’ enjoyment, ceasing access to the landlord, or improper maintenance of the rental unit. § 1-21-1002(a)(vi)