Louisiana Lease Agreement Templates (6)

A Louisiana lease agreement is a mutually agreed-upon rental contract between a landlord and a tenant. In addition to any supplemental terms and conditions, the tenant agrees to pay rent and maintain the property throughout the lease term. While oral leases are allowed, it is recommended that the arrangement be written and signed to avoid potential conflicts. Non-written agreements are almost impossible to dispute should an issue arise.

 

Last updated March 30th, 2024

A Louisiana lease agreement is a mutually agreed-upon rental contract between a landlord and a tenant. In addition to any supplemental terms and conditions, the tenant agrees to pay rent and maintain the property throughout the lease term. While oral leases are allowed, it is recommended that the arrangement be written and signed to avoid potential conflicts. Non-written agreements are almost impossible to dispute should an issue arise.

 

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By Type (6)

Standard Lease Agreement – Signed by the lessee and the lessor, the rental contract outlines the terms and conditions for a fixed period, typically one year. 
Commercial Lease Agreement – Agreed upon by a business entity and a landlord, this arrangement outlines the terms and regulations for renting a property.
Month-to-Month Lease Agreement – a 30-day contract that renews monthly without a fixed end date, or with 30-day notice from either the renter or the landlord.
Rent-to-Own Agreement – In addition to the terms outlined in the Standard Lease Agreement, it includes details and conditions on how the renter can purchase the property from the owner.
Roommate Agreement – A formal document between 2 or more individuals sharing a residence that outlines the expectations of living together.
Sublease Agreement – The initial tenant, sublessor, rents out all or part of their rental unit to a new tenant, the sublessee. This contract is between the original tenant and the new renter. The sublessor remains legally bound by the conditions set forth with the landlord.

Disclosures (1)

Lead-Based Paint Disclosure – For properties built before January 1, 1978, renters must receive a pamphlet on the dangers and how to identify lead-based paint, any known information concerning the presence of lead-based paint hazards, and this attachment to the lease agreement.

Security Deposit

Maximum Amount – Louisiana is considered a landlord-friendly state and does not govern the maximum amount a landlord can charge the tenant as a security deposit.

Collecting Interest – Landlords are not mandated to collect interest on the tenant’s security deposit while they hold the funds.

Returning to Tenant – The landlord has 1 month from the end of the lease term to return the security deposit to the tenant, minus any funds withheld for damages or unpaid rent. These deductions must be itemized in a list with a statement explaining the reasons. (Source: RS 9:3251(A)) If the landlord fails to return the security deposit or the itemized list with the remaining balance, if applicable, within 30 days, they will be subject to a $300 fine or twice the amount of the deposit, whichever is greater. (Source: RS 9:3252(A))

Landlord Access

General Access – The landlord can lawfully enter the property at any time without notice. However, it is recommended that they give at least 24-hour notice out of respect for the tenant and their privacy.

Emergency Access – The landlord can enter the rental premises at any time.

Paying Rent

Grace Period – If rent is not paid on the date disclosed on the lease agreement, the landlord can begin the eviction process with a 5-day notice. No state-mandated Grace Period exists in Louisiana unless otherwise disclosed on the contract.

Maximum Late Fee – A Louisiana landlord can charge a late fee for delayed rent payments as much as he or she wants. However, this fee must be detailed in the lease.

Returned Checks (NSF) – For a bounced check or dishonored payment method, the landlord in Louisiana can charge $25 or 5% of the payment amount, whichever is greater. (Source: RS 9:2782(B))

Reasons for Eviction (3)

Non-Payment of Rent – The lessor can serve the tenant with a 5-day notice if the lessee does not pay rent. This gives the tenant 5 business days to move out of the rental unit, excluding holidays. (SourceCCP 4701)

Non-Compliance – If the lessee violates a term of the rental contract, the landlord can give the tenant a 5-day notice to vacate the rental unit. This timeframe excludes holidays and weekends. (SourceCCP 4701)

Lease Termination – The landlord can issue a 5-day notice if the tenant remains in the property after the lease ends. If the lease has no expiration date, the landlord can serve a 30-day notice to leave the premises. (SourceCCP 4701)