Colorado Lease Agreement Templates (6)

A Colorado lease agreement is a legally binding contract between a landlord and a tenant for renting a property. The document outlines terms such as rent, duration, and responsibilities. Colorado law requires that the formal document comply with state landlord-tenant laws to ensure fairness and protection for both parties.

Last updated March 26th, 2024

A Colorado lease agreement is a legally binding contract between a landlord and a tenant for renting a property. The document outlines terms such as rent, duration, and responsibilities. Colorado law requires that the formal document comply with state landlord-tenant laws to ensure fairness and protection for both parties.

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By Type (6)

Standard Lease Agreement – a legally binding document that outlines the terms and conditions of renting a residential property. The contract must follow state landlord-tenant laws. The typical length of a standard lease agreement is 12 months long. 
Commercial Lease Agreement – a contract between a landlord and a business tenant. The legally binding document specifies the terms and conditions of renting a commercial property.
Month-to-Month Lease Agreement – a flexible and short-term rental contract. It automatically news each month between the landlord and a tenant.
Rent-to-Own Agreement – a legal document between a landlord and a tenant. It outlines the tenant’s eventual rental property purchase terms and conditions. Typically, a portion of the rental payments will go toward the purchase.
Roommate Agreement – a contract between individuals sharing a rental property, outlining each person’s rights and responsibilities, providing clarity and protection.
Sublease Agreement – a contract in which a current tenant rents out all or part of the rented property to another person. The new person is considered the sublessee, and they are subject to the original lease terms.

Disclosures (3)

Warranty of Habitability Disclosure  – The landlord is deemed to warrant that the residential premises are fit for human habitation. C.R.S. § 38-12-503(1)

Bed Bug Disclosure – Upon asking, a Colorado landlord must disclose the most recent inspection date and confirm the property is free of bed bigs within the last 8 months. C.R.S § 38-12-1005

Mold Disclosure – Landlords must disclose any known mold hazards in the rental property and provide information on how to report mold issues. C.R.S. § 38-12-503(2.2)

Lead-Based Paint Disclosure – Landlords must inform tenants about the dangers of lead-based paint if the property was built before 1978. Landlords must also disclose whether there is any lead-based paint in the rental.

Security Deposit

Maximum Amount – There is no limit set on security deposits in Colorado.

Returning to Tenant – Unless the lease specifies a longer period, up to 60 days, landlords must return a tenant’s full security deposit within one month after the lease ends, or the tenant surrenders the premise. The deposit cannot be withheld for normal wear and tear on the property. C.R.S. § 38-12-103(1)

Keeping the Security Deposit – If any portion of the security deposit is retained, the landlord must provide a written astatement detailing the reasons and refund the difference. This statement any any payment must be mailed to the tenant’s last known address. The landlord can keep the deposit for reasons such as nonpayment of rent, adandonment, or unpaid utilities or repairs.  C.R.S. § 38-12-103(1)

Landlord Access

General Access – There is no state requirements in Colorado but landlords should provide reasonable notice to tenants before entering the rental unit, except in cases of emergency. This notice should typically be at least 24 hours, and entry should be during reasonable house.

Paying Rent

Grace Period – There is no state-mandated forgiveness period for paying rent in Colorado. However, the lease agreement may specify rent due dates and any applicable grace periods, which are typically 5 days.

Maximum Late Fee – Colorado state law does not mandate a specific limit on a late fee for overdue rent. While the landlord can charge a late fee, it must be reasonable and specified in the lease.

Returned Checks (NSF) – If a rent payment is returned for insufficient funds, landlords can charge a returned check fee, but it must also be reasonable and specified in the lease.

Reasons for Eviction (3)

Non-Payment of Rent – Landlords can start the eviction process if rent is not paid within a specified grace period, as outlines in the lease agreement. The landlord must give written notice to the tenant, which can either be delivered in person or by mail. After the tenant receives the notice, they have 10 days to pay the rent, or move out of the property. However, if the property is commerical or employer-provided, the notice period is 3 days. For certain residential agreements, the notice period is 5 days. C.R.S § 13-40-104(D) 

Non-Compliance – Violating lease terms, such as a no-pets policy, or causing damage to the property can also lead to eviction. The landlord must give the tenant a 10-day notice to fix any issues or move out (a “Demand for Compliance or Right to Possession notice”). The landlord can start an eviction lawsuit if the tenat does not fix the problem within 10 days. Landlords with certain exempt residential agreements can give a shorter notice of 5 days.  C.R.S. § 13-40-104(E)

Illegal Activity – Tenants can be evicted for “substantial violation” activities in or near the rental property, including common areas. If the tenant does not leave the unit within 3 days, the landlord can file an eviction lawsuit.  C.R.S. § 13-40-107.5